Mental Illness on the Fringe

Mental Illness On The Fringe

 

I call this the mental health-mental illness effort a beginning because we are square one on this subject. I thought we were further along. We are not. We are schooled by the anecdotal increase in tragedies associated with mental illness; by we I mean those of us who are working the front lines. The statistics that we care about are people.

 

We all know individuals who went down suffering with depression, other forms of challenges — the inner world when it goes dark. And the increase in use of heroin and other dangerous drugs in our neighborhoods and communities have multiplied; we know those stories too, we don’t have to cite figures from the NIMH.
We are under-prepared, under-educated, under-equipped. We are still laboring under the shanda curtain of shame. Some of us took on the shame barrier with drug and alcohol abuse starting in 1981 (see SLICHA, now called Shalvah), we are turning our attention to the next hurdle which I believe is mental illness. We all have the experience in our families, some of us more hidden than others. We begin by talking about it; let’s talk about mental illness.

 
What to do, that’s always the question. Start with talk and more talk, real talk about real problems. We need to do that with depression and suicide and the other challenges to life that dwell within, the inner world when it goes dark. Take up a candle, light it, give that light to someone else.
Don’t let anybody go dark on our watch.

 
I wrote this pledge, and I took it:
The Pledge
1) I pledge to bring someone in. If I light a candle, I will share the light.
2) I will be a reminder in every way I can to my family, friends, and
community: we have these problems, they are difficult, but there is no
shame attached to them and we live in a Big Tent.
3) We can live with our problems.
4) I pledge to break the *shanda* barrier, which means:
5) Talk, talk, and more talk.
6) I pledge to remind my community that we are working our problems,
that being secret may be part of the problem, therefore:
7) I will not practice aloneness. I will talk with somebody. I will pick up the phone.
*Shanda* means shame. There is none.

 
I’ve been using this pledge at all our sessions. It’s not sloganeering; It’s a raising of the curtain that hides our shame. Our shame is deadly when it keeps us from asking for help. The more we lift that curtain the more likely our most vulnerable ones will find their way to some help at least to some relief.

 
Our problems are serious, deep, numerous. Our problems are lucky to have us; our devotion to them endless. Let’s get to work. Spend some time listening and talking, tell your leadership and your intimates and your trust-ables that we are suffering and we need to crack our best effort to split the darkness. We need to be a community.

 
Don’t respect the silence. Then push.

 

jsg

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